Multidisciplinary Approach

Every KidsVoice client is represented by both an attorney and Child Advocacy Specialist (a social service professional with expertise in social work, mental health, education or child development). Our innovative approach has been recognized nationally and replicated in other states.

Multidisciplinary Representation

Advocating for the Whole Child

The KidsVoice innovative multidisciplinary team approach provides quality advocacy to the children we represent. Every KidsVoice client is represented by an attorney and Child Advocacy Specialist (a social service professional with expertise in social work, mental health, education or child development) who work together on that case as a "case team." The case team gets to know each child and what that child wants as well as assessing the full range of social, physical, psychological, educational and legal needs of the child. This enables the case team to make tailored recommendations that lead to the best opportunities for each child's unique situation.

The needs of children in the child welfare system encompass so much more than where they are placed. Thus, our involvement needs to be more than handling just the legal aspects of the substitute care system. Children in substitute care have full, complex lives of their own with difficulties and successes; with health care needs like seeing a dentist for perhaps the first time or getting glasses; with interest in after school activities like band, drama, or sports; and with all the other daily ins and outs of life, plus the more unique aspects of being in placement, like having consistent visits with parents and siblings.

Advocating for the whole child involves more than participating in court hearings and can include:

  • Helping children successfully reunify with their parents
  • Getting help for medical, mental health and developmental needs
  • Ensuring that children are in the appropriate educational setting and are making academic progress
  • Providing access to recreation opportunities
  • Helping children receive therapeutic services as victims of abuse or domestic violence
  • Getting guidance for youth who are themselves moms or dads
  • Providing assistance to youth who want to pursue post-secondary education or training opportunities
  • Assisting youth in learning to live on their own, independently, after substitute care

Every step of the way, we want our clients to understand that they have rights as individuals in the child welfare system. We stress to them that they should know their rights.

Our approach has been recognized on a national level, and has been replicated in other states across the nation, changing the practice of child advocacy.